• Susan Haigh

In Awe of Nature's Brilliance

Updated: Mar 5

The March of the Seasons


It is March, the month when winter officially turns to spring. Optimism for growth abounds. The blossoming of life springs into action. Is that why this season is called spring? or do we say things spring into action because that is the nature of nature at this time of year? Regardless of the words used to describe life, an unstoppable quickening is happening which in turn raises our spirits. We are not separate from nature, the increasing daylight hours recharge our body's batteries and awakes in us a renewed zest for life. We give a happy sigh and celebrate that once again we have made it through winter.



Here on the west coast of Canada, our winter has been mild with only a brief week or two of cold in early February. Interestingly the early snowdrops that had bloomed in January were weak and ravaged by slug and bugs. After the cold spell, a second more robust crop of flowers burst from the ground. It appears the cold was just what the plants were waiting for. As soon as it was over spring flowers were vigourously keen to show their colour.






Orange crocus began to dot the garden and primulas smiled up at me.

My favourite spring flower,

a very early small red tulip, was quick to follow,

pushing up through winter debris.

One year a late snowfall had caught the tulip blooming but it was resilient and came to no harm. That is a painting yet to come.















Another year I painted crocus and primulas peeking out from fresh snow.














In the studio I am painting roses, dreaming of summer. It is a happy place to be. In the winter it may be frozen or soaking cold outside but I have my eyes full of flowers, their colourful cheer warming my soul. Sometimes though, I am snapped out of my cozy reverie by the cold creeping in. The wood stove needs feeding! Quickly I try to catch it before it dies completely. My firewood is not the best this year so

I have to pay attention, which can be

a tad tricky when engrossed in painting.




This week I need to package up my 'Blossom Smoke' painting and send it off to the Federation Gallery in Vancouver.

It will be part of the "Bloom" Exhibition

which runs in conjunction with an ikebana display March 15 - 28.


Sadly, the valiant flowering almond featured in the painting has since died, a casualty in the rebuilding of a septic system.



There is much that could be done out in the garden as the weather improves. It could easily overwhelm a person. I just put blinders on and deal with one thing at a time and disregard the rest, for now. Last week I finished pruning my 13 fruit trees! That was a big accomplishment. I have always said I have the best of both worlds. When it rains I can go to my studio, when the sun shines I can work and play in gardens.


So with March here, the catkins on the hazelnut are fluffing out pollen and their tiny red flowers are starting to show. At the edge of the forest the Indian plum's flowers are beginning to droop down out of the leaves and their heavy scent is filling the yard.

Scratchy throats, dry eyes and a stuffy nose, some of the symptoms of spring allergies, not Covid 19!


On that happy note, I thank you for reading my blog. I am thinking I will post once a month for starters and see how that goes. It is fun to share the wonders to be found in nature.

There is so much to see and marvel at, so much brilliance calling out to be painted.

Feeding off the potential of Spring, we can dare to March to a different drum every day!







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